Article

In a move to encourage researchers to make their work open to the public, the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Calgary established funds that faculty and graduate students could use cover publication charges for open-access journals. Berkeley and Calgary are two of several funds established in recent years, including the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of Wisconsin – Madison, the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, the University of Oregon, and other sites in the U.K.

Six months after the new, strengthened version of the NIH OA policy took effect, it faces a bill in Congress to overturn it. Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) introduced the Fair Copyright in Research Works Act (H.R. 6845) on September 9. Conyers is the chairman of the powerful House Judiciary Committee, which is the House committee most responsible for copyright legislation, especially through its Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet, and Intellectual Property. The subcommittee held a hearing on the Conyers bill on September 11. (For links to the bill and hearing, see the bibliography below.)

Many JCB readers will remember Heather Joseph (nee Dalterio) from her time as Managing Editor of the ASCB’s journal, Molecular Biology of the Cell in the late ‘90s. Her drive to “get people the information
they need, when they need it, and in the form they want it”, has led her to the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), where she serves as Executive Director.

We had a big victory in the Senate last month. For the first time ever, the Senate voted to demand an OA mandate at the NIH. Because the House of Representatives adopted the same language in July, this is also the first time ever that both houses of Congress have demanded an OA mandate at the NIH.

A variety of resources are available to guide the launch and operation of an open-access journal. To promote awareness of these resources, and to facilitate their efficient use, this section provides a high-level index to these guides by topic.

On December 26, 2007, President Bush signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008 into law. The bill contained language requiring all investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to place a copy of manuscripts resulting from NIH-funded research into the National Library of Medicine's online repository, PubMed Central, to be made publicly available within one year of publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The policy will take effect April 7, 2008, and will impact three constituencies on college and university campuses: NIH-funded investigators; institutional research administrators and legal counsel; and librarians. This paper will explore the new policy's requirements of each constituency, the roles each may consider playing to ensure effective compliance with the policy, and the new opportunities that are afforded to all of the three groups by this groundbreaking initiative.

We are pleased to announce the first results of an ongoing research project. The overall project has two phases. Phase One is to make a comprehensive list of scholarly societies worldwide that support gold OA for their own journals. The journals might be full OA or hybrid OA, and the society's relationship to its journals might be that of owner, publisher, or partner with the publisher. (For convenience, when we say below that a society "publishes" an OA journal, we'll mean that it has at least one of these relationships to it.) The list includes the journals themselves, and associated data, as well as the societies.

In a move to encourage researchers to make their work open to the public, the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Calgary established funds that faculty and graduate students could use cover publication charges for open-access journals.

Why Open Access?

Pages

SPARC Resources

View resource portal»

Why Access Matters