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A variety of resources are available to guide the launch and operation of an open-access journal. To promote awareness of these resources, and to facilitate their efficient use, this section provides a high-level index to these guides by topic.

On December 26, 2007, President Bush signed the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008 into law. The bill contained language requiring all investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to place a copy of manuscripts resulting from NIH-funded research into the National Library of Medicine's online repository, PubMed Central, to be made publicly available within one year of publication in a peer-reviewed journal. The policy will take effect April 7, 2008, and will impact three constituencies on college and university campuses: NIH-funded investigators; institutional research administrators and legal counsel; and librarians. This paper will explore the new policy's requirements of each constituency, the roles each may consider playing to ensure effective compliance with the policy, and the new opportunities that are afforded to all of the three groups by this groundbreaking initiative.

We are pleased to announce the first results of an ongoing research project. The overall project has two phases. Phase One is to make a comprehensive list of scholarly societies worldwide that support gold OA for their own journals. The journals might be full OA or hybrid OA, and the society's relationship to its journals might be that of owner, publisher, or partner with the publisher. (For convenience, when we say below that a society "publishes" an OA journal, we'll mean that it has at least one of these relationships to it.) The list includes the journals themselves, and associated data, as well as the societies.

In a move to encourage researchers to make their work open to the public, the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Calgary established funds that faculty and graduate students could use cover publication charges for open-access journals.

Why Open Access?

Heather Joseph talks about her career with SPARC and BioOne. She discusses the NIH mandate that NIH-funded research will be deposited into PubMed Central, and she shares her views on some of the controversial issues the mandate has raised about copyright, peer review, and embargo periods. She also addresses the recent decision by the Harvard faculty to make their scholarly output accessible through the university’s institutional repository, and she suggests ways that librarians can help their faculties prepare for open access.

Update by Ray English, Director of Libraries at Oberlin College (April 2009)

This page provides priorities for supporting Open Educational Resources.

December 26, 2007, was a historic date for the international movement supporting public access to taxpayer­funded research. With the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2007 (H.R. 2764) being signed into law, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) became the first U.S. federal agency required to make the results of its funded research freely ac­cessible online to the public.

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