ACRL/ARL/SPARC provide free access to archive of author rights web cast

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ACRL and ARL, through the Institute on Scholarly Communication, along with SPARC present:

Understanding Author Rights

This special joint one hour webcast is aimed at librarians working with faculty on author rights. The sponsors are underwriting costs to make the archive (recorded June 18, 2007) freely available to the broader community.

Now you, too, can view the archived webcast <http://www.learningtimes.net/acrl_arrarchive.html> . To access this Elluminate recording, you'll need a free LearningTimes account. Clicking the webcast link above will get you started on that process.

Program description:

This one hour webcast is designed to help librarians better engage disciplinary faculty and researchers on the topic of author rights. Learn the basic issues and understand outreach strategies.

A journal article is often the culmination of years of study, research, and hard work. The more the article is read and cited, the greater its value. But if authors give exclusive control to the publisher in the copyright agreement, use may be limited. Many authors wonder:

  • Can I post my articles on a course Web site? What about in an institutional repository?
  • Can I give copies of my published article to my class or colleagues?
  • Is it okay to post articles in NIH's PubMed Central?
  • Can I include sections of my article in later works?

Many libraries want to answer these questions and help authors modify publishers' copyright transfer agreements to keep key rights to their articles. Educate faculty on your campus before they transfer ownership of their intellectual output and help them understand the consequences and options. Increase your visibility on campus, your influence on the higher education and research environment, and become a respected local authority on this important scholarly communication issue.

Presenters:

  • Julia Blixrud, Assistant Director for Public Programs of SPARC
  • Trisha Davis, Rights Management Coordinator of The Ohio State University Libraries

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ACRL <http://www.acrl.org/> is a division of the American Library Association, representing 13,500 academic and research librarians and interested individuals. ACRL is the only individual membership organization in North America that develops programs, products and services to meet the unique needs of academic and research librarians. Its initiatives enable the higher education community to understand the role that academic libraries play in the teaching, learning, and research environments.

ARL <http://www.arl.org/> is an association of over 120 of the largest research libraries in North America. The member institutions serve over 160,000 faculty researchers and scholars and more than 4 million students in the US and Canada. ARL's mission is to influence the changing environment of scholarly communication and the public policies that affect research libraries and the diverse communities they serve. ARL pursues this mission by advancing the goals of its member research libraries, providing leadership in public and information policy to the scholarly and higher education communities, fostering the exchange of ideas and expertise, and shaping a future environment that leverages its interests with those of allied organizations.

SPARC <http://www.arl.org/sparc> (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), with SPARC Europe and SPARC Japan, is an international alliance of more than 800 academic and research libraries working to create a more open system of scholarly communication. SPARC is a founding member of the Alliance for Taxpayer Access, a coalition of patient, academic, research, and publishing organizations that supports open public access to the results of federally funded research - including research funded by the National Institutes of Health.