News Archives - 2012

June 04, 2012
By:
Jocelyn Kaiser, ScienceInsider
A petition urging the White House to expand federal policies requiring free access to taxpayer-funded research papers has gotten the 25,000 signatures needed to trigger a response.
June 04, 2012

The movement to make taxpayer-funded research freely available online hit a new milestone on Sunday when advocates hit their goal of 25,000 signatures to a “We the People” petition to the Obama administration. The petition, created by Access2Research (a group of Open Access advocates, including SPARC’s Executive Director, Heather Joseph), requests that President Obama make taxpayer-funded research freely available.

June 01, 2012

A sustainable, Open Access scholarly communication system requires robust, stable sources of funding. One key source of such funding are campus-based Open Access funds - pools of money provided academic institutions specifically earmarked to help authors offset the cost of journal publication.

June 01, 2012
1. News from SPARC and the Alliance for Taxpayer Access
June 01, 2012
 1. News from SPARC and the Alliance for Taxpayer Access
May 31, 2012
By:
Christopher A. Hesh, American Medical Student Association
Barriers to healthcare access manifest in many forms and AMSA stands at the forefront of the fight to tear down these barriers in the effort to establish healthcare as a human right. Integral to this fight for access is the engine that drives discovery of healthcare delivery methods and new treatment programs: taxpayer-funded research.
May 31, 2012
By:
Paul Jump, TheTimes Higher Education
Open-access advocates have attempted to build up a head of steam in the US by launching a petition on the White House website calling on the Obama administration to require all publicly funded research in the country to be made freely available online. Launched on 20 May, it attracted 15,000 signatures in its first four days. This was already more than half of the 25,000 signatories that must be obtained within 30 days in order to trigger an official response from the US government.
May 30, 2012
By:
Jared Woodard, The Street
"We all face the same paradox. We faculty do the research, write the papers, referee papers by other researchers, serve on editorial boards, all of it for free ... and then we buy back the results of our labour at outrageous prices." That sentiment, expressed in April by Robert Darnton, the director of the Harvard library, is the reason why the rich profit margins enjoyed for so long by publishers like Reed Elsevier will prove unsustainable in the face of technological change.

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