Policy

May 17, 2007

Today, Science Commons and the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) announce the release of new online tools to help authors exercise choice in retaining critical rights in their scholarly articles, including the rights to reuse their scholarly articles and to post them in online repositories.

November 29, 2012
SPARC (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) is pleased to announce the dates for our second biennial North American meeting on Open Access on March 2-4, 2014 in Kansas City. 
January 30, 2013

While the debate continues over U.S. federal policies to ensure the results of scientific research are openly accessible online, a key group of critical, private research funders has moved quietly and steadily to make such policies a reality.

May 03, 2006

A smoldering debate over whether taxpayers should have free access to the results of federally financed research intensified yesterday with the introduction of Senate legislation that would mandate that the information be posted on the Internet.

December 18, 2007

A provision mandating public access to research published by NIH-funded scientists has survived this week. The provision was originally part of a funding bill that President George W. Bush vetoed last month. It mandates that the NIH adopt a policy requiring agency-funded scientists to post their published research on the agency's publicly-accessible digital archive, PubMed Central within 12 months of appearing in peer-reviewed journals. The specifics of that policy are vague in the bill and will be left to the NIH to hammer out should the law be passed. For example, it remains unclear whether the law would affect previous grantees or just current and future grantees, Peter Suber,an open access advocate, told __The Scientist__. "It will take NIH a while to figure out which policy it wants to adopt."

September 11, 2007

“The Association of American Publishers has landed in hot water with university presses and research librarians, as well as open-access advocates, thanks to a new undertaking that is billed as an attempt to “safeguard the scientific and medical peer-review process and educate the public about the risks of proposed government interference with the scholarly communication process.”

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