Libraries

It’s a hot topic at academic conferences, library association meetings, and scientific forums. During the past decade, the debate about how to transform scholarly publishing has animated discussions around the globe. The problem is clear: Scholarly journals cost too much. But though a variety of solutions has been proffered, none has yet been so widely embraced that the underlying structures have shifted appreciably…

SPARC is an active participant in the Information Access Alliance (IAA), a group of library organizations working to highlight the budgetary impact of the rapid escalation of the price of information, particularly of journals in science, technology,

This guide will help your organization: navigate its new role as policy influencer; communicate effectively with the media; deliver an effective message; sell a particular story; act as a valued media source. And if something goes wrong, this guide will pilot you through the most important points of crisis communications.

A presentation by Heather Joseph to the Texas Library Association.

This Guide has been published by the Open Society Institute (OSI) to encourage and assist planners, developers, and potential publishers of new Open Access journals in any field of science and scholarship. It provides a good starting point for those contemplating the launch of a new journal based upon an Open Access business model that provides free availability of research papers. For those who are already in the process of launching an Open Access journal, this Guide provides resources to help ensure that your planning is complete.

SPARC was started in 1997 by a number of large research libraries in the US. Its main goal was restore a competitive balance of the STM journals publishing market. A number of programmatic areas were initiated in order to realize this goal: SPARC Alternatives, SPARC Leading Edge, SPARC Scientific Communities, and SPARC Communication and Advocacy. Since two years SPARC puts a special emphasis on Open Access, including institutional repositories. The paper gives an overview of the activities of SPARC and its partners in these areas. The results are evaluated and compared with the measures defined in 1997. Finally, the paper describes the possibilities for libraries to contribute to the realization of SPARC’s goals.

"We the undersigned, member universities of the Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) or their affiliated libraries, write to register our strong support for the Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA, H.R. 4004 and S. 2096).

Over the past several years, libraries have strategically brought to bear the power of a global awareness event we call “Open Access Week” to advance real, policy-driven scholarly communication change on campus. Initiated by students and marked by just a few dozen campuses in 2007, Open Access Week has evolved into a truly global phenomenon thanks to the ongoing leadership of the library community.

On June 19, Heather Joseph, Dr. Reggie Raju, and Iryna Kuchma gave helpful updates in their regions and suggestions in planning a successful Open Access Week.

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