Sharing enables new research to build on earlier findings. It not only fuels the further advancement of knowledge, it brings scientists and scholars the recognition that advances their careers.

This SPARC / Science Commons white paper discusses both the motivation and the process for establishing a binding institutional policy that automatically grants a copyright license from each faculty member to permit deposit of his or her peer-reviewed scholarly articles in institutional repositories, from which the works become available for others to read and cite.

This White Paper is written primarily for policymaking staff in universities and other institutional recipients of NIH support responsible for ensuring compliance with the Public Access Policy.

This section features case studies of established and evolving partnerships. Partnerships are invited to submit descriptions of their own initiatives that highlight specific aspects of partnering (for example, financial arrangements, management and governance structures, etc.).

Over the past few months, there has been a growing number of scholars on our campuses who have signed onto or expressed support for the actions called for in the boycott statement on the "Cost of Knowledge" website. SPARC has prepared a “suggested next steps” resource.

This report presents the finding of a project which investigated the extent to which publishing has now become a core activity of North American academic libraries and suggested ways in which further capacity could be built.

SPARC was started in 1997 by a number of large research libraries in the US. Its main goal was restore a competitive balance of the STM journals publishing market. A number of programmatic areas were initiated in order to realize this goal: SPARC Alternatives, SPARC Leading Edge, SPARC Scientific Communities, and SPARC Communication and Advocacy. Since two years SPARC puts a special emphasis on Open Access, including institutional repositories. The paper gives an overview of the activities of SPARC and its partners in these areas. The results are evaluated and compared with the measures defined in 1997. Finally, the paper describes the possibilities for libraries to contribute to the realization of SPARC’s goals.

Over the past several years, libraries have strategically brought to bear the power of a global awareness event we call “Open Access Week” to advance real, policy-driven scholarly communication change on campus. Initiated by students and marked by just a few dozen campuses in 2007, Open Access Week has evolved into a truly global phenomenon thanks to the ongoing leadership of the library community.

"We the undersigned, member universities of the Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) or their affiliated libraries, write to register our strong support for the Federal Research Public Access Act (FRPAA, H.R. 4004 and S. 2096).